05
Mar
11

And Now, A Summary

Throughout the book of Deuteronomy, we will see Moses retelling the story of the Israelite journey from Egypt.  The very first example of this appears in the first chapter:

“In the fortieth year, on the first day of the eleventh month, Moses proclaimed to the Israelites all that the LORD had commanded him concerning them.”Deuteronomy 1:3

Why would Moses need to retell to these people the story of what had happened to them?  I can think of two reasons.  The first is that the story needed to be told to the younger generation, who might not have experienced all of these events.  Recall that the purpose of the forty years of wandering was to rid the Israelite population of the entire generation of men who were alive during the exodus from Egypt (see Deuteronomy 2:14).  So, there were lkely many young men at the end of the journey who needed to be told the history.

The second reason is even greater – people need reminding.  It is a human tendency to forget, or to lose sight of things over time.  God did amazing and wondrous things during the exodus, but it is clear from reading many of the subsequent stories that they do not recall God’s power.  Aren’t we like that today?  Do we need constant reminding about what God has done for us?  We do, and that’s why we remember the death of Jesus each week during communion – “Do this in remembrance of me.”

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