08
Aug
11

Where David Leaves His Wealth

Many men live their lives in order to leave an inheritance for their children and future generations – an honorable motive.  King David went to even greater purposes than this with his worldly wealth.

Then King David said to the whole assembly: “My son Solomon, the one whom God has chosen, is young and inexperienced. The task is great, because this palatial structure is not for man but for the LORD God.  With all my resources I have provided for the temple of my God—gold for the gold work, silver for the silver, bronze for the bronze, iron for the iron and wood for the wood, as well as onyx for the settings, turquoise, stones of various colors, and all kinds of fine stone and marble—all of these in large quantities.  Besides, in my devotion to the temple of my God I now give my personal treasures of gold and silver for the temple of my God, over and above everything I have provided for this holy temple.  — 1 Chronicles 29:1-3

David gave his own wealth away to the temple construction because he understood that God is to be honored above all else – even above his own son.  And in David’s final prayer we see that he understands where wealth and good things come from.

David praised the LORD in the presence of the whole assembly, saying,

“Praise be to you, O LORD,
God of our father Israel,
from everlasting to everlasting.
Yours, O LORD, is the greatness and the power
and the glory and the majesty and the splendor,
for everything in heaven and earth is yours.
Yours, O LORD, is the kingdom;
you are exalted as head over all.
Wealth and honor come from you;
you are the ruler of all things.
In your hands are strength and power
to exalt and give strength to all.
Now, our God, we give you thanks,
and praise your glorious name.

— 1 Chronicles 29:10-13

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Where David Leaves His Wealth”


  1. April 16, 2014 at 8:41 am

    Hi there, You’ve done a great job. I will definitely digg it and personally suggest to my friends.
    I’m confident they’ll be benefited from this website.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Join In!

I encourage discussion. Please hit the subscription link below, and/or hit the "Leave a Comment" hyperlink at the top of any article!

Blog Archives

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 31 other followers

Contact Alan


%d bloggers like this: